When Latex Zombies Attack

                                            Escape Design FX

                                          Escape Design FX

During All-Con in Dallas, a child asked me if I had ever been frightened by my work. I laughed at first, but then realized that there was in fact one occasion when I did freak-out and yes, my creations played a role.

During All-Con in Dallas, a child asked me if I had ever been frightened by my work. I laughed at first, but then realized that there was in fact one occasion when I did freak-out and yes, my creations played a role.

It was several years ago, I was working on a zombie project. I had cast a number of latex bodies and hung them around the shop. If you were to walk into the shop that day it would appear as if I were hosting a George Romero day at the gallows.  There had to be at least six zombies hanging by some long cord. A definite sight.

I had hung them up to make them easier for me to paint them. I was in a pretty good mood. I was happily bringing my dreadful creations to life. I had my boy, Huey Lewis, on the radio and my airbrushes at the ready. I was good to go.

I remember working on the details of a zombie’s rib cage when suddenly Huey’s song, Jacob’s Ladder, went off the air and was replaced by an ear-piercing emergency tone. It startled me at first. It kinda ripped me out of my serene rhythm.

                                          Escape Design FX

                                        Escape Design FX

I remember taking in my surroundings for a moment. I am surrounded by zombies when an emergency tone comes across on the radio. I laughed a bit at the potentially cliched scene I was currently cast in. I went back to painting waiting for the emergency tone to die off.

The tone stopped and a voice crackled over the air waves. This didn’t sound like a test. Then, BOOM! I heard a shotgun blast outside and unexpectedly the shop was dark. The power was out. 

The tone was eerie all by its self. The shotgun got my adrenaline going. The sudden darkness kind of amplified the situation.

I felt my way around the shop toward the showroom where I keep a mini flashlight hanging above the light switch. With all that happened in a short space of time, I am pretty amped up. I am not proud of myself, but on my way to the showroom I felt something brush my shoulder and the hair on the back of my neck stood on end.

I knew I was surrounded by zombies. I put them there. So, I guess I should have been expecting to bump into one, but I didn’t. And to be honest, this zombie got pretty handsy with me. Again, I am not proud of this, but I freaked out and went psycho ninja on this fucker.

After laying down some serious ninja welfare tactics,  I finally settled down. I took a breath and laughed it off. I moved toward the showroom and grabbed the flashlight. I turned it on and turned back toward the shop.

                                           "Russ Mode"

                                          "Russ Mode"

I had just had an altercation with a latex zombie, so I guess I should have expected it to be moving, but again, I was in sensory over load. The zombie was swinging from the cord and it looked like it was coming to get me. For the second time in just a few seconds I am again in full on psycho ninja and there may have been some screaming.

Disgusted, embarrassed, and pissed off, I said to hell with the work and I stomped out of the studio and went home.

The next day I saw a guy from the power company using a large pole to put a fuse in the transformer next to the shop. That shotgun blast I heard was a squirrel meeting his end. According to the guy from the power company, squirrels like to run along the power line and on occasion they get too close to the big fuse things near the transformers. When they touch them, the fuse thing explodes. It can sound like a shotgun blast. The exploding fuse and dead squirrel caused the power to go out.

Oh sure, but where the hell was that explanation last night during the zombie attack?

I never did find out why the emergency broadcast came on the air. Since I never heard anything about an apocalypse after that, I assume it was just a test.  

                                 "A Workshop with Russ Adams"

                              "A Workshop with Russ Adams"

So, yes, my work does scare me at times under the right conditions.

  There had to be at least six zombies hanging by some long cord. A definite sight.

I had hung them up to make them easier for me to paint them. I was in a pretty good mood. I was happily bringing my dreadful creations to life. I had my boy, Huey Lewis, on the radio and my airbrushes at the ready. I was good to go.

I remember working on the details of a zombie’s rib cage when suddenly Huey’s song, Jacob’s Ladder, went off the air and was replaced by an ear-piercing emergency tone. It startled me at first. It kinda ripped me out of my serene rhythm.

I remember taking in my surroundings for a moment. I am surrounded by zombies when an emergency tone comes across on the radio. I laughed a bit at the potentially cliched scene I was currently cast in. I went back to painting waiting for the emergency tone to die off.

The tone stopped and a voice crackled over the air waves. This didn’t sound like a test. Then, BOOM! I heard a shotgun blast outside and unexpectedly the shop was dark. The power was out. 

The tone was eerie all by its self. The shotgun got my adrenaline going. The sudden darkness kind of amplified the situation.

I felt my way around the shop toward the showroom where I keep a mini flashlight hanging above the light switch. With all that happened in a short space of time, I am pretty amped up. I am not proud of myself, but on my way to the showroom I felt something brush my shoulder and the hair on the back of my neck stood on end.

I knew I was surrounded by zombies. I put them there. So, I guess I should have been expecting to bump into one, but I didn’t. And to be honest, this zombie got pretty handsy with me. Again, I am not proud of this, but I freaked out and went psycho ninja on this fucker.

After laying down some serious ninja welfare tactics,  I finally settled down. I took a breath and laughed it off. I moved toward the showroom and grabbed the flashlight. I turned it on and turned back toward the shop.

I had just had an altercation with a latex zombie, so I guess I should have expected it to be moving, but again, I was in sensory over load. The zombie was swinging from the cord and it looked like it was coming to get me. For the second time in just a few seconds I am again in full on psycho ninja and there may have been some screaming.

Disgusted, embarrassed, and pissed off, I said to hell with the work and I stomped out of the studio and went home.

The next day I saw a guy from the power company using a large pole to put a fuse in the transformer next to the shop. That shotgun blast I heard was a squirrel meeting his end. According to the guy from the power company, squirrels like to run along the power line and on occasion they get too close to the big fuse things near the transformers. When they touch them, the fuse thing explodes. It can sound like a shotgun blast. The exploding fuse and dead squirrel caused the power to go out.

Oh sure, but where the hell was that explanation last night during the zombie attack?

I never did find out why the emergency broadcast came on the air. Since I never heard anything about an apocalypse after that, I assume it was just a test.  

So, yes, my work does scare me at times under the right conditions.

 

Keep any eye out for additional books in my new how-to series, A Workshop with Russ Adams now available on Amazon.com 

Finally, don't forget to check out my other blogs here on RUSS MODE

KILL'EM WITH INFO

ANIMELAND WASABI 2017

THE IMPORTANCE OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN THE CREATIVE PROCESS

6 STEPS OF CREATIVITY--AND THE STRESS THAT COMES WITH THEM (BTS)

 

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